Free Schemes of Work

To assist teachers in preparing for lessons and make the integration of basic metalwork skills easier, Flamefast offers schemes of work for Low-Temperature Casting. Other Schemes of Work for other hot metal techniques will be added as they become available.

The projects are designed so that teachers can select as little or as much support as they need. Each scheme contains all the information required to teach the expected skills and develop pupils’ skills knowledge and understanding.


Making a Pewter Casting Model

Learning objectives include:

  • Be aware of the relationship between a part and a mould
  • Understand the concept of logically operating on parametric solid objects to create new objects
  • Be able to create a mould from a modelled object so that a casting can be made
  • Understand the relationship between 3D Solid modelling and CNC machining

Casting Into a Cuttlefish Mould

Learning objectives include:

  • Understanding the processes involved in the production of a small object cast in metal
  • Be in a position to go from initial design to the finished manufactured product
  • Develop an understanding of the use of a low melt metal (Pewter) as a design material
  • Observe safety aspects required for a practical activity in the classroom

Casting Into a Cardboard Mould – Airplane

Learning objectives include:

  • Understanding the processes involved in the production of a small object cast in metal
  • Be in a position to go from initial design to the finished manufactured product
  • Develop an understanding of the use of a low melt metal (Pewter) as a design material
  • Observe safety aspects required for a practical activity in the classroom

Casting Into a Cardboard Mould – Jewellery Set

Learning objectives include:

  • Understanding the processes involved in the production of a small object cast in metal
  • Be in a position to go from initial design to the finished manufactured product
  • Develop an understanding of the use of a low melt metal (Pewter) as a design material
  • Observe safety aspects required for a practical activity in the classroom

Pupils should be taught about hazards, risks and risk control during activities using heat treatment equipment. Teachers will need to judge when it is appropriate to introduce pupils to cutting, shaping and forming techniques. They should ensure that pupils recognise hazards, assess risks and take steps to control the risk to themselves and others.

Cast a Head for a Walking Stick

Learning objectives include:

  • Understanding the processes involved in the production of a small object cast in metal
  • Be in a position to go from initial design to the finished manufactured product
  • Develop an understanding of the use of a low melt metal (Pewter) as a design material
  • To understand the process of Lost Wax.
  • To understand the process of Lost Wax.
  • Observe safety aspects required for a practical activity in the classroom

Casting with a Plaster Mould

Learning objectives include:

  • Preparing the mould
  • Adding the plaster
  • How to release the template
  • Casting the item
  • The finished item

Design a Screwdriver (Forging)

Core Task:

Pupils will generate and develop an idea based upon a basic screwdriver. They will have extended their knowledge through investigation work at home and in school which deals with the familiar concept of a screwdriver. During teacher evaluation of their work they will communicate their design idea using an orthographic 3rd angle projected drawing using drawing instruments. Using a box construction they will draw freehand an isometric drawing of their chosen design idea. They will use these drawings to aid their construction and during manufacture they will add notes and further sketches and ideas about new materials, skills and processes learned.

Using a range of tools that are appropriate to the task they will add these to their portfolio and demonstrate their ability to operate certain tools and equipment. They could receive a certificate of competence of tool use at this level. If their work fails to meet the requirements at the first attempt they will modify their work in light of this failure. Attention will be paid to measuring and checking procedures as the work develops. At the end of the project they will test their work against the criteria and chosen design, completing an evaluation on what they know, understand and can do well, what was successful about their design and how the design could be improved.

Bus Stop (Multi Process)

Design Brief:

A major problem encountered within the local community is the continual vandalism of bus shelters. A request has been made for a new style of shelter which must meet specific requirements. Pupils are tasked with studying the design brief, carrying out a design audit and then a manufacturing audit.

Pupils are then required to manufacture a scale model of their design using the materials and processes to be used in the final construction. This is then presented for evaluation together with their design portfolio.

Candelabra (Multi Process)

Design Brief:

A Candelabra is defined as a large branched candlestick. An example would be the Menorah which originally had seven branches and stood in the Temple symbolising Judaism and the state of Israel. During Hanukkah, candles are lit each night and placed in what is now likely to be an eight branched candlestick, with a ninth used to light the rest..

There are many events where candles can both symbolise a special occasion or are used just to provide an atmosphere. The design brief is to design a candelabra with no more than three branches which can be used decoratively as a centre piece for a dinner party.

Community Design (Multi Process)

Design Brief:

You are commissioned to prepare an artefact which will have pride of place at a forthcoming celebration at the opening of your new local community centre. When completed it will reside in the entrance hall and its unveiling will take place in 15 weeks.

Enamelled Jewellery (Multi Process)

Design Brief:

Enamel is a vitrified coating of various colours used for decorative purposes and can be applied to metallic or porcelain surfaces. In cloisonné the various selections of the design are separated by thin wires or strips. In champlevé the enamel is poured into engraved cavities in the metal surface.

Pendants as a form of jewellery have been worn for centuries. Celtic designs are still very popular today, using a process called enamelling which is a decorative process formed onto copper blanks. Pupils are to design a simple shape which identifies one of the seasons, Spring, Summer, Autumn or Winter. For example, an Autumn leaf , a winter snow flake or a spring daffodil.

Shoe Horn Mini Project

Design Brief:

Shoes are often difficult to get on. Design and make a product that will make it easier to put your shoes on. For further details regarding this project contact John Hooson at Royton and Crompton School Blackshaw Lane, Royton, Oldham. OL2 6NT

Support Sheets

Contains:

  • Improved design details for sheet steel products
  • Improved design details for cast metal products
  • Decoration using screen printing
  • Vitreous Enamels

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